Diversion

Society's Alternative to Prosecution

The diversion program is intended to give a "second chance" to offenders who commit a relatively minor criminal offense. Most often, cases referred to the program are a misdemeanor level offense, but some felony offenses are suitable for consideration.


Why Offer This Program?

Diversion Wrong The diversion program is intended to give a "second chance" to offenders who commit a relatively minor criminal offense. Most often, cases referred to the program are a misdemeanor level offense, but some felony offenses are suitable for consideration.

We realize people make mistakes, so we offer diversion in an attempt to deter defendants from future criminal and disorderly behaviors. It also serves the courts by reducing the number of less serious cases, in turn creating a more efficient system for judges, juries and taxpayers.

Let it be known: Diversion is a privilege, not a right. There is no guarantee diversion will be granted. The District Attorney holds the right to deny an individual from entry into the program.

Who is Eligible?

Juveniles facing a first-time criminal offense will be screened for Diversion. 

Diversion is for youth who require minimal intervention and supervision to be successful. 

The Diversion program provides minimal supervision in accordance with risk and need.  This level of supervision must be appropriate to ensure community safety and victim input. 

The level of impact of the offense means that some cases are not eligible for Diversion.

Juveniles will also be screened for Diversion using the Arizona Risk and Needs Assessment screening tool. 

Juveniles with a moderate to high score on this tool are ineligible for Diversion.

Juvenile Diversion eligibility is provided in compliance with CRS 19-2-303. 

Weld County Adult Diversion program eligibility is similar.

Can I Apply?

No. The diversion team will evaluate those eligible cases and will contact you if you fall within the eligibility requirements. Our team will consider whether the defendant demonstrates a genuine sense of remorse and is ready to take responsibility for his or her actions.

What Can Participants Expect?

Diversion is typically a 90-day program in which defendants will be required to complete certain tasks in order to avoid prosecution. Task include, but are not limited to, community service, educational classes, counseling or research projects, BA/UA monitoring and restorative justice mediations.

In addition, defendants are required to be employed or attending school, avoid unlawful behaviors, abstain from drug and alcohol usage and check in with a diversion officer.

What Happens After Diversion?

Assuming the defendant complied with the requirements of the diversion program, it's a warm-welcome back to society. After the successful completion of the program, the District Attorney's office will drop all charges. Just don't break the law again.